Entertainment Blogs

  • Family watching TV (Getty Images)Family watching TV (Getty Images)

    There's so much hype about TV shows such as Game of Thrones and the recent superhero shows like The Flash and Arrow, but the way we watch shows has changed. You can now stream your favourite episodes online (or download them via torrent, if you're a pirate).

    Here are some observations about how different the experience is from the years ago.

    I recall a time when I would sit at the sofa with my family, and all of us would wait for our show to begin. The various commentaries from my mother would irritate us, because she never seemed to understand that she was interrupting our viewing. But that’s what made watching TV fun — being with my family and enjoying some time together after going about our individual busy lives.

    Now, though, I can watch any show I like on my laptop in my room. Although it’s fun to have the screen all to myself, I sometimes feel lonely when I laugh to myself as I respond to whatever the characters just said.

    Watching the usual free-to-air shows on television also

    Read More »from How has watching television online changed the way we live?
  • One of the most notorious murder mysteries may have just been solved thanks to the unmasking of 'Jack the Ripper'. One of the most notorious murder mysteries may have just been solved thanks to the unmasking of 'Jack the Ripper'.

    A stall in "hipster kopitiam" Salut Coffeeshop in Bukit Merah called “Jack Ripper” seems to be trying too hard to be edgy.

    It has named the burgers on its menu after the actual five victims of the notorious London serial killer: Mary Ann, Annie, Elizabeth, Mary Jane and Catherine, according to local food blogger Daniel Ang, who wrote about the stall in an entry on his blog DanielFoodDiary.

    "Am I the only person around who doesn’t even find this vaguely funny?" Ang wrote in his post in reference to the burgers' names.

    He noted that Salut Coffeeshop is sometimes known as the “ang moh” coffeeshop, because of the Western-style stalls there, and that it can get pretty crowded during peak hours.

    The stall is a collaboration between Absinthe’s Executive chef Nicholas Reynard and Stew Kuche’s owner’s son, who is also the owner of the coffeeshop, according to Ang.

    Reacting to Ang’s post on Facebook about the stall, Facebook user Emily Su wrote, “That is distasteful to me too… I wouldn’t want

    Read More »from Stall in 'hipster kopitiam' names burgers after Jack the Ripper victims
  • 'Play' project featuring playground at 110 Bedok North Road (Photo courtesy of Stefen Chow)'Play' project featuring playground at 110 Bedok North Road (Photo courtesy of Stefen Chow)

    [CORRECTION: A previous version said Stefen Chow is Singaporean. He is actually a Malaysia-born Singapore PR.]

    Remember when we used to plan a time with our peers to hang out at the playground after school, playing catch or just running around the premises?

    To remind us of those times, about more than a year ago, Stefen Chow, a photographer who grew up in Singapore and is presently based in Beijing, came up with the concept to capture the playgrounds all over Singapore.

    The photographs of the playground are then uploaded to the "Play" website, where they are arranged according to the Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) map. Users can click on any station to view the playground from that area.

    Officially supported by the SG50 committee, Chow, together with economist Lin Hui-Yi, decided to focus on playgrounds in Singapore because they felt that the smaller things in the city-state needed as much recognition as the more iconic structures such as the Marina Bay Sands or the Merlion.

    Chow notes, “We

    Read More »from Remembering childhood: ‘Play’ features 100 playgrounds in Singapore
  • <span style=color: #000000; font-family: Arial; font-size: small; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 1; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; background-color: #ffffff;>BSG takes to the skies again at Universal Studios Singapore</span>

     

    Sci-fi themed roller coaster Battlestar Galactica will re-open at Singapore’s Universal Studios this week after several stop-starts over the past five years.

    Resorts World Sentosa (RWS) said Monday that the world’s tallest dueling roller coaster will re-open on May 27, with all-new ride vehicles.  The ride will feature all-new two-seater vehicles that are designed to give “every rider a more intimate and personal ride experience and will enhance the feeling of speed and thrill the ride already offers”, the resort operator added.

    The  troubled ride - inspired by the hit TV series produced by Universal Cable productions - first shut down just a week after the theme park opened backi in 2010. At that time it closed down due to technical problems, when cracks were found in the seat-post supports of the coaster cars. It re-opened in February 2011 but was then closed in July 2013 to undergo a major overhaul and review.

    Read More »from Universal Studios Singapore set to re-open Battlestar Galactica
  • Scene from Singapura: The Musical (Photo courtesy of Singapura: The Musical)Scene from Singapura: The Musical (Photo courtesy of Singapura: The Musical)

    "Singapura: The Musical" officially opened on Saturday, 23 May, in a world premiere at the newly refurbished Capitol Theatre in Singapore.

    The production, which comprises an international cast of largely Filipinos, shows Singapore’s trying times in the decade from 1955 to 1965. It follows Tan Kok Yang, who is a bus driver, and his family, attempting to tell the story of the ordinary people who lived during those turbulent times as Singapore struggled to find its place in the world.

    Here are five thoughts on the approximately three-hour long musical.

    Accents/ Language

    Scene from Singapura: The Musical (Photo courtesy of Singapura: The Musical)Scene from Singapura: The Musical (Photo courtesy of Singapura: The Musical)

    The production is by a Filipino company, so it is no surprise that a majority of the cast is made up of Filipinos. What is surprising, though, is that although plenty of effort has been put in to create a musical about Singapore’s history, with extensive interviews and research done, they failed to get the accent and language right.

    Throughout the show, lines are peppered with Singlish, but delivery was only mildly

    Read More »from Review: Five thoughts on ‘Singapura: The Musical’
  • Grant Gustin as The Flash.Grant Gustin as The Flash.

    It's a question that always hits at the end of every season. It's particularly apt in the age of binge-watching, where you can literally finish an entire season within a weekend. 

    The finales of your favourite TV shows play out, and  the end credits roll. And then you find yourself asking: "Okay. So what do we do with our lives now?"

    That feeling has hit particularly hard in recent weeks. The Flash has just finished its first season, while Arrow's third season is done. Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is over as well, while The Walking Dead finished its fifth season a while back.

    You promise us a multiverse and more zombies and more Hydra, and now we have to wait an entire year before you come back? Seriously?

    This isn't fair. And in the pantheon of first world problems that form my universe, that ranks pretty damn high. What am I supposed to do in the meantime? Go to work? Lead a productive life? Spend time with my wife? The most meaningful time we spend together is when we watch TV!

    Read More »from My favourite TV shows ended. What do I do with my life now?
  • Screen grab taken from Pretentious-o-meter website.&nbsp;Screen grab taken from Pretentious-o-meter website. 

    Award-winning Singapore movie Ilo Ilo, done by homegrown filmmaker Anthony Chen is filled with local nostalgia and family issues that hit close to home.

    However, based on new website Pretentious-o-meter, it’s almost pretentious – it's 80 per cent pretentious to be exact.

    But, how does the website determine a film’s level of pretentiousness?

    The site, created by computer developer Niall Beard, looks at the gap between IMDB and Rotten Tomatoes’ public and critic ratings.

    “The pretentious-o-meter calculates the difference between critic and public opinion for a film on Rotten Tomatoes and IMDB. This is then plotted on the meter. Plots towards 'pretentious' mean the audience didn't like it but the critics loved it. Plots towards 'mass market' mean critics didn't care for it but the audience loved it.”

    This is the result for Ilo Ilo:

    Screen grab taken from Pretentious-o-meter website.&nbsp;Screen grab taken from Pretentious-o-meter website. 

    If the bar on the meter is Green, it means it’s a great film and that a lot of people liked it. Yellow means it’s deemed as average while red means people

    Read More »from According to this meter, Singapore’s Ilo Ilo is 80 per cent pretentious
  • The Star Wars franchise would never have existed if George Lucas had been just a little less persistent. In an interview with film critic Leonard Maltin before the release of The Phantom Menace in 1999, the filmmaker revealed that his pitch for the now legendary space opera was rejected by not one, but two studios.

    "United Artists had the first option. They said no. They didn't want it. Then I took it to Universal because I'd just finished American Graffiti and they said no. They didn't want it.," he told Maltin.

    Lucas finally took what would later become Episode IV: A New Hope to 20th Century Fox and studio executive Alan Ladd Jr said he was interested.

    "He said 'I don't understand this, but I loved American Graffiti and whatever you do is okay with me," Lucas said.

    "Otherwise, I don't think it would ever have got done."

    Ladd was not only the man who approved the movie, but also the one who fought tooth and nail to keep it alive when the studio wanted to axe the movie after filming

    Read More »from #Maythe4thbewithyou: Star Wars almost never got made
  • One DirectionOne Direction

    One Direction fans in Singapore can hardly contain their excitement as they rave on about the popular UK boyband on social media hours ahead of their first concert on Wednesday at the Singapore Sports Hub.

    “They’re finally here!”
    “I can’t believe they’re in Singapore!”

    These were some of the tweets posted about the five-piece group, who are, Liam Payne, Zayn Malik, Louis Tomlinson, Harry Styles and Niall Horan.

    The five of them, who have produced four albums and sung chart-topping songs like “Story of My Life” and “Steal My Girl”, will be performing as part of their On the Road Again Tour.

    Read More »from One Direction fans rave about the UK boyband being in first Singapore concert
  • Actor Hugh Jackman attends a photo call for the film 'CHAPPIE' at Hotel De Rome on February 27, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images for Sony Pictures)Actor Hugh Jackman attends a photo call for the film 'CHAPPIE' at Hotel De Rome on February 27, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images for Sony Pictures)

    Hugh Jackman’s villainous role in the upcoming science-fiction movie Chappie comes with a bad hairdo — a mullet.

    In a Skype interview with Singapore reporters on Saturday, Jackman said the hairdo isn't part of a requirement for being a villain, but "it certainly does turn people off".

    He joked that he initially thought the hairdo would be flattering on him.

    “I thought it might work in my favour because when I met my wife, 19, 20 years ago, it was on a TV series where I had a mullet, and I thought it was going to remind her of the man she fell in love with."

    It was not to be, however. “As soon as I came home with the haircut, she was like, ‘It wasn’t the haircut, let me tell you that,’” Jackman laughed.

    In the movie, Jackman plays an Australian, as he is in real life. The mullet is part of a look that director Neill Blomkamp discussed with him about the kind of person his character should be.

    The character in the movie is someone who has a lot of pride in what he has achieved and walks

    Read More »from Hugh Jackman’s role in sci-fi film 'Chappie' comes with bad hairdo

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